Posted inStone Age Archaeology

Evidence Reveals Surprising Dietary Practices of Pre-agricultural Human Groups in Morocco 15,000 Years Ago

For years, the common belief has been that pre-agricultural hunter-gatherer societies relied heavily on meat. However, new evidence from a groundbreaking study reveals a surprising twist in the dietary practices of ancient human groups in Morocco, suggesting a marked preference for plant-based food over 15,000 years ago. The study, conducted by a team of international […]

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Turtle Shells from 50,000 Years Ago Carried as “Living Provisions” by Early Humans or Neanderthals During the Last Ice Age, Found in Germany

Numerous gravel quarries in the middle Elbe valley near Magdeburg have already yielded many significant archaeological discoveries from the period between the Middle Pleistocene (Weichselian glaciation) and the modern era. At the Barleben-Adamsee gravel quarry, in addition to flint tools, five fragments of turtle shells between 42,000 and 50,000 years old have been found. These […]

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Oldest Incised Bone Found in Northern Europe Demonstrates Early Cognitive Abilities of Neanderthals

A bear radius fragment with seventeen incisions (one of them incomplete) was excavated in the 1950s in the Dziadowa Skała Cave in the Upland of Częstochowa, southern Poland, from a deposit with fauna remains from the Eemian period (between 130,000 and 115,000 years ago). This object has been cited as the earliest evidence of Neanderthals’ […]

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The Italian site of Pirro Nord does not Contain, as Previously Thought, the Oldest Evidence of Human Presence in Western Europe

A new study led by the National Center for Research on Human Evolution (CENIEH) has revealed the first datings of a significant Paleolithic site in Italy. Published in the journal Quaternary Geochronology, this study presents findings that challenge previous beliefs about the chronology of Pirro Nord, located in Apricena, Italy, suggesting that this site could […]

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Analysis of Schöningen Spears, the Oldest Complete Ones Preserved, Reveals Advanced Wood Processing Techniques 300,000 Years Ago

Back in 1994, something incredible happened during archaeological digs at an open-pit coal mine in Schöningen. Archaeologists found the oldest complete hunting weapons ever discovered, ancient spears and a throwing stick buried alongside old animal bones near a lake, about ten meters deep. Over the following years, they dug up a bunch of wooden pieces […]

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The Discovery of Paleolithic Art Made with Charcoal in France will Allow for More Precise Dating

The Dordogne region in southwestern France is home to over 200 sites with Paleolithic parietal art, making it one of the richest areas in the world in this regard. One of the most important sites is the Font-de-Gaume cave, known for its bison representations, but whose paintings are difficult to date due to the type […]

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Rare find in Germany: Complete Cave Bear Skeletons, Jaws, and Paleolithic Stone Tools Unearthed

During archaeological investigations in the Ansbach district, Bavaria, Germany, in 2022, thousands of cave bear bones from the Stone Age and various stone tools were uncovered. Between August and October of this year, archaeologists stumbled upon additional findings during new excavations, presumably dating back to the Paleolithic era. Of particular interest to scientists is the […]

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Remains of a Paleolithic hut from 16,800 years ago, discovered in La Garma Cave in Cantabria

Recent archaeological investigations carried out in La Garma Cave, Cantabria (Spain), have allowed for the detailed documentation of the remains of a Paleolithic hut built 16,800 years ago. It is one of the best-preserved prehistoric dwellings in the world. The work was made possible thanks to the support of the PALARQ Foundation and the project […]

Posted inStone Age Archaeology

Early Paleolithic humans ate roasted tortoises, among other things

Recent archaeological discoveries are providing new insights into what early humans ate thousands of years ago. Scientists have found evidence that Middle Paleolithic humans, who lived between 81,000-45,000 years ago, had a more varied diet than previously thought. Analysis of a site in the Zagros Mountains of Iran reveals they hunted not just large grazing […]