Posted inStone Age Archaeology

Look of 4000-year-old Norwegian Hunter-Gatherer whose Remains were Found on Hitra Island, Reconstructed

In 1916, construction workers in Norway made an unexpected discovery while building a road on Hitra Island. Amidst the sand and rocks, they uncovered human remains belonging to a 25-year-old man from the Stone Age, estimated to be 4,000 years old. Since then, these remains have been a subject of study at the NTNU University […]

Posted inStone Age Archaeology

Europe’s Oldest Megastructure Discovered: 12,000-year-old Wall Submerged in the Baltic Sea

In fall 2021, geologists made an unusual discovery in Mecklenburg Bight bay in Germany – a nearly kilometer-long row of stones on the seafloor. Located about 10 km from Rerik at a depth of 21 meters, the site contained approximately 1,500 stones arranged in such a regular pattern that a natural origin seemed unlikely. A […]

Posted inStone Age Archaeology

Scandinavia’s Early Farmers Wiped Out Hunter-Gatherer Population 5,900 Years Ago

A new study from Lund University in Sweden is challenging long-held beliefs about the transition from hunter-gatherer to agricultural societies in Scandinavia. Analyzing DNA extracted from skeletons and teeth dating back 7,300 years, researchers found evidence of not one but two almost complete population replacements occurring in what is now Denmark. The first change took […]

Posted inStone Age Archaeology

The Oldest Long-distance Weapons, Identified in Belgium, are 31,000 Years Old

Archaeologists in Belgium have made an incredible discovery that changes our understanding of prehistoric technology. Researchers at the University of Liege’s TraceoLab found evidence that hunter-gatherers were using long-range weapons over 31,000 years ago. This discovery predates the oldest known harpoons by about 10,000 years and shows that ancient humans innovated powerful new hunting techniques […]