Posted inStone Age Archaeology

Face of a 75,000-year-old Neanderthal Woman whose Remains were Found in Shanidar Cave Reconstructed

A team of archaeologists and researchers, led by the University of Cambridge, has painstakingly reconstructed the face of a female Neanderthal who lived around 75,000 years ago and was buried in the heart of Iraqi Kurdistan. The story began in 2018 when the team excavated the remains of this Neanderthal woman from the Shanidar cave, […]

Posted inStone Age Archaeology

Oldest Incised Bone Found in Northern Europe Demonstrates Early Cognitive Abilities of Neanderthals

A bear radius fragment with seventeen incisions (one of them incomplete) was excavated in the 1950s in the Dziadowa Skała Cave in the Upland of Częstochowa, southern Poland, from a deposit with fauna remains from the Eemian period (between 130,000 and 115,000 years ago). This object has been cited as the earliest evidence of Neanderthals’ […]

Posted inStone Age Archaeology

Neanderthals Found to Use Complex Adhesives Before Homo Sapiens

Scientists have made a surprising discovery about the advanced capabilities of ancient humans in Europe over 40,000 years ago. A team of researchers reexamining stone tools from the Neanderthal site of Le Moustier in southwestern France found evidence that the early cave dwellers were using a multi-component adhesive to attach handles to spear points and […]

Posted inStone Age Archaeology

Oldest Northern Settlement of “Homo sapiens”, Where Humans and Neanderthals Coexisted for Millennia, Discovered

A genetic analysis of bone fragments excavated from an archaeological site in central Germany provides conclusive evidence that modern humans – Homo sapiens – had reached northern Europe around 45,000 years ago. This dates their arrival thousands of years earlier than previously thought and shows that they co-existed with Neanderthals for several millennia before the […]