The Rosenstrasse protest, when German women saved their Jewish husbands by confronting the Nazi regime

In 2003 the German Margarethe von Trotta, director, scriptwriter, actress and wife of the famous writer Volker Schlöndorf, won the David de Donatello Award (the most important in the Italian film industry) in the category of best European movie with her film Rosenstraße. It is a German-Dutch co-production whose protagonist also won the award for…Continue readingThe Rosenstrasse protest, when German women saved their Jewish husbands by confronting the Nazi regime

Jasper Maskelyne, the magician who fooled the Germans with his tricks in World War II

In 1983, the famous magician David Copperfield caused a sensation by making the New York City Statue of Liberty disappear in a live television broadcast. It is curious that almost forty years before, in the middle of World War II, another illusionist also performed a magical feat of great proportions, although in his case it…Continue readingJasper Maskelyne, the magician who fooled the Germans with his tricks in World War II

The French resistance in Lille that saved time for the British to be evacuated in Dunkirk

If we talk about battles of the Second World War, the names of some that are already inevitable references will come to mind, from Stalingrad to Berlin to El Alamein, Pearl Harbor, Guadalcanal, the Bulge and several more very famous ones. But there were others that are not so well known, even if some of…Continue readingThe French resistance in Lille that saved time for the British to be evacuated in Dunkirk

Mariya Oktyabrskaya, the Soviet woman who paid for the manufacture of a tank and drove it personally to avenge her husband’s death

Although women’s participation in World War II was more active than it may seem at first glance, their role was primarily in the rearguard, working in the war industry or in auxiliary positions in logistics, for example. Of course, there was no shortage of cases of female partisans and guerrillas, but the almost absolute protagonism…Continue readingMariya Oktyabrskaya, the Soviet woman who paid for the manufacture of a tank and drove it personally to avenge her husband’s death

Eduard Bloch, the Jewish doctor whom Hitler helped to leave Germany in 1940

In March 1941 it had been about a year and a half since the outbreak of World War II, but there were still eight months before Pearl Harbor was attacked and the United States entered the fighting. That’s why Collier’s Weekly, one of the most important and widely read weeklies in the country at the…Continue readingEduard Bloch, the Jewish doctor whom Hitler helped to leave Germany in 1940

When Allies and Germans fought together in World War II: The Battle for Castle Itter

Austria seems to have a certain magnet for unusual military events. It was in the Austrian village of Itter in the Tyrol that one of the strangest battles of the entire Second World War took place. It was liberated on May 5, 1945, just five days after Hitler committed suicide in his Berlin bunker, and…Continue readingWhen Allies and Germans fought together in World War II: The Battle for Castle Itter

Rettungsboje, the rescue buoy devised by the Germans in World War II to save downed pilots

Searching for a castaway lost at sea is an arduous and often frustrating task. Unless the search area can be narrowed down a lot, the task can be prolonged so long that probably when he or she is finally located – if at all – he or she is already dead from hypothermia, dehydration or…Continue readingRettungsboje, the rescue buoy devised by the Germans in World War II to save downed pilots

10 heroines of World War II

The history of the Second World War is full of heroic actions carried out by men and women, often little known but whose work was indispensable in the discourse of war. Women were actively involved in virtually every aspect of the conflict, both military and civilian. For example, the British intelligence service (SOE) had 55…Continue reading10 heroines of World War II

Martha Ellis Gellhorn, the only woman to land in Normandy on D-Day

Many readers will probably know who Martha Ellis Gellhorn was, but for those who don’t, they just need to know that she’s not one of those characters who sometimes force their way into war movies. She was the only woman, as far as is known, who landed in Normandy on D-Day covering World War II…Continue readingMartha Ellis Gellhorn, the only woman to land in Normandy on D-Day

Kohima, the fiery battle that prevented the Japanese from invading India.

“Walker, go and tell Sparta that their children lie here for obeying their laws.” That splendid phrase of Simonides, which, in its multiple translations, constitutes the epigraph of the monument to Leonidas in the Thermopylae, is too juicy not to take advantage of it in other war memorials with the corresponding changes. It is what…Continue readingKohima, the fiery battle that prevented the Japanese from invading India.