The Lemnos Stele, a funerary inscription from the 6th century B.C. that links the Pelasgians to the Etruscans

In 1885, a unique stele was found as part of the walls of a church in the town of Kaminia on the Greek island of Lemnos. It has been dated to the 6th century BC, prior to the conquest of the island by the Athenians in 510 BC to the Pelasgians. This was the name…Continue readingThe Lemnos Stele, a funerary inscription from the 6th century B.C. that links the Pelasgians to the Etruscans

Corupedium, the battle that ended the long war between Alexander’s successors

It is curious that one of the most extensive empires of antiquity had such a weak foundation that, in reality, it was only based on the charisma of its builder. We’re talking about Alexander the Great. That giant with feet of clay that he formed with his military genius fell apart as soon as his…Continue readingCorupedium, the battle that ended the long war between Alexander’s successors

Onesicritus, the historian whom Alexander the Great sent to learn the secrets of the yogis

Astypalaia is a small island in the Greek Dodecanese, possibly a colony of Megara, where around 360 B.C. Onesicritus, a historian and cynic philosopher who followed Diogenes of Sinope ( the one who lived like a beggar in a jar), was born. In 334 BC, when he was 26 years old, he crossed the Hellespont…Continue readingOnesicritus, the historian whom Alexander the Great sent to learn the secrets of the yogis

Electrum, the natural gold and silver alloy used to mint the first metal coins

If we were to ask about a metal alloy used since the beginning of history, the unanimous answer would surely be bronze. And, in fact, this combination of copper and tin gives its name to a whole period of prehistory, so that we could perhaps consider it the most important until the appearance of others.…Continue readingElectrum, the natural gold and silver alloy used to mint the first metal coins

Where did the books from the Great Library of Alexandria come from?

The great Library of Alexandria was founded at the beginning of the 3rd century BC by Ptolemy I Soter. At its peak it housed an impressive 900,000 manuscripts. It was not only a storehouse of books, but also an entire research and teaching center that brought together numerous scholars from different centers of classical culture.…Continue readingWhere did the books from the Great Library of Alexandria come from?

12 most important Greek archaeological discoveries in the last decade

Listing the most important archaeological discoveries of the last decade is complicated, no matter which country, region or place in the world you choose. But especially in Greece, due to the abundance and proliferation of finds, from Prehistory to the Middle Ages. Therefore, what better way than to turn to the Greeks themselves to find…Continue reading12 most important Greek archaeological discoveries in the last decade

The Iliad and the Odyssey are just two of the eight poems from the Epic Cycle that narrate the Trojan War.

The Epic Cycle, also called the Trojan Cycle because it narrates events related to the Trojan War, is a collection of eight poems composed in dactylic hexameter, the traditional type of verse of the Greco-Latin epic. The two most famous, for having been preserved complete, are The Iliad and The Odyssey, both attributed to Homer.…Continue readingThe Iliad and the Odyssey are just two of the eight poems from the Epic Cycle that narrate the Trojan War.

How Aristotle’s personal library arrived in Rome, almost 300 years after his death

Throughout history, books have been a highly prized commodity. Their trade goes back many centuries to the invention of materials such as papyrus and parchment, and the creation of libraries by accumulating and copying books gave rise to collections as famous as that of Alexandria. Unfortunately, many libraries were lost due to various circumstances. Others…Continue readingHow Aristotle’s personal library arrived in Rome, almost 300 years after his death

How the ancient Greeks invented a telegraphic system for transmitting messages

The history of cryptography is almost as old as that of human language. It is known that the ancient Egyptians, Chinese, Indians or Greeks used more or less sophisticated methods of encrypting messages, as shown by some documentary examples that have survived. Generally associated with the military field, the need to send messages also produced…Continue readingHow the ancient Greeks invented a telegraphic system for transmitting messages