Abram Gannibal, the African slave who became a military engineer, general of the Russian army and great-grandfather of the writer Alexander Pushkin

There is an episode from the eighteenth century that in a way seems to come from a work of fiction: that of Abram Petrovich Gannibal, an African prince kidnapped by the Otmans but bought by a Russian ambassador who took him to his country, where, after a careful education, he reached high military and political…Continue readingAbram Gannibal, the African slave who became a military engineer, general of the Russian army and great-grandfather of the writer Alexander Pushkin

Superman Red Son, the alternative history of the superhero in the Soviet Union

As we know, a huge cataclysm destroyed the planet Krypton but a scientist managed to save his newborn son, Kal-El, from total destruction by putting him in a spaceship and launching him into space. Thus, the baby arrived on Earth, to a farm in Smallville, Kansas, where he was adopted by a couple who discovered…Continue readingSuperman Red Son, the alternative history of the superhero in the Soviet Union

A BBC documentary made millions believe that they could grow spaghetti at home

“Put a sprig of spaghetti in a can of tomato sauce and wait for the best“. This is the answer the BBC gave to viewers who called asking how they could grow spaghetti at home. We are not crazy. This is a funny episode that happened in the United Kingdom in 1957, after the famous…Continue readingA BBC documentary made millions believe that they could grow spaghetti at home

Delia Bacon, the writer who proposed the first theory about Shakespeare’s true identity

The debate about the authorship of Shakespeare’s works is not recent; it began about a century and a half after his death, when Herbert Lawrence suggested it in 1771, and it has continued ever since, with people like the famous poets John Milton and Samuel Taylor Coleridge, the historian J. Thomas Looney or the journalist…Continue readingDelia Bacon, the writer who proposed the first theory about Shakespeare’s true identity

The foundation researching how to avoid gravity, whose essay prize was won by Stephen Hawking and five Nobel laureates in physics

A boy who witness his sister drown in a Massachusetts river and comes to the conclusion that gravity is to blame for everything: she was unable to fight gravity, which came up and grabbed her like a dragon and carried her off, he wrote. As an adult, he studies at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology),…Continue readingThe foundation researching how to avoid gravity, whose essay prize was won by Stephen Hawking and five Nobel laureates in physics

Saxhorn, saxtuba, saxotromba and other lesser known instruments created by the inventor of saxophone

Although, more or less, we think we know all the musical instruments, it’s not really like that. Throughout history there have been many, many, only a good part of them fell into disuse and were relegated to oblivion. But we are not referring only to other times but also to this one. In times as…Continue readingSaxhorn, saxtuba, saxotromba and other lesser known instruments created by the inventor of saxophone

5 literary works, lost in the last 5 centuries, which could have been exceptional

In many articles we have mentioned lost works of antiquity, only known today by the fragments cited by later authors. This is the case of the works of Onesycritus, Megasthenes or Euhemerus of Messina, but also some works of Aristotle, Diodorus of Sicily, Archimedes, Julius Caesar, Eratosthenes, Titus Livius, Pliny the Elder or Suetonius, among…Continue reading5 literary works, lost in the last 5 centuries, which could have been exceptional

How Humphrey Bogart homaged chess in Casablanca, and named a gambit

Many readers may like chess and may even be good at it. What is not so likely anymore is that they have ever heard of the Humphrey Bogart gambit. The gambit is a move in which a piece – usually a single pawn – is sacrificed at the beginning of the game for strategic purposes.…Continue readingHow Humphrey Bogart homaged chess in Casablanca, and named a gambit

The 5 cultural world shelters under special protection by Blue Shield and UNESCO

On May 14, 1954, the Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict was signed in The Hague. As its name indicates, this treaty obliges the signatory states (today 126) to protect cultural heritage in the event of war, both their own and that of the eventual enemy. In its…Continue readingThe 5 cultural world shelters under special protection by Blue Shield and UNESCO

The wrought iron bar chain that saved the Amiens Cathedral from collapsing

The Amiens Cathedral, listed as a Historical Monument in 1882 and included in the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1981, is a reference in its style and also has a series of curious elements that make it particularly interesting. One of them is the famous labyrinth that paves the floor of the nave; another, the…Continue readingThe wrought iron bar chain that saved the Amiens Cathedral from collapsing